The Aston Martin DBS with six-cylinder was always in the shadow

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The Aston Martin DBS with six-cylinder was always in the shadow
The Aston Martin DBS with six-cylinder was always in the shadow

In 1969, James Bond fans had some news to digest: 007 was featured in the new movie by George Lazenby and his company car was an Aston Martin DBS for the first time. That James Bond “only” moved a Seschs cylinder instead of a V8 sports car had a simple reason.

Actually, the Aston Martin DBS, first shown in Paris in 1967, was designed for the developing V8 engine. Therefore, the larger width of about 1.8 meters stirs. But the new engine was not ready for production at the end of 1967 and so it was just the well-known straight-six from the DB6 in normal and Vantage specification in the wide bow.

Much power

Even so, 286 or 330 DIN-PS could be sent to the rear axle. Completely new, however, was the rear axle, which was designed according to the DeDion principle, while the front triangle wishbones provided for the bike guidance. Brakes were naturally disc brakes, the rear were mounted inside.

By rearranging the engine, the weight distribution compared to the DB6 could be optimized, as empty weight Aston Martin promised about 1600 kg and thus only 35 kg more than the DB6.

For discerning connoisseurs with a thick purse

However, the DBS cost 4473 pounds, almost 35 percent more than the DB6. In Switzerland 63’750 francs were due, similar to what had to be invested for a twelve-cylinder Ferrari or an eight-cylinder Maserati.

After all, they also received a well-equipped and elegant coupe, whose design came from William Towns, who later designed the spectacular Lagonda for Aston.

At the service of Her Majesty

In 1968, when the James Bond filmmakers searched for a modern car for their screen agent, they found what they were looking for at Aston Martin. For example, Bond was given a DBS Vantage for Her Majesty’s Secret Service. The car had in the movie with the exception of a rifle compartment show no special intelligence extras and was seen only in a few scenes.

But that was the dramatic final scene when Bond, newly married to Tracy, embarks on a honeymoon and is murdered at the first march. The Lazenby Bond is considered unsuccessful, but actually no other movie in the US played more money on the first day than this one.

On the sales success of the DBS, the film success, however, had little impact. He remained a marginal phenomenon as a six-cylinder.

The V8 came yet

A more powerful engine was needed, the DBS V8 was introduced in 1969. It was not quite ready, however, and the first units were delivered in 1970. Visually, the differences were small, but the difference in terms of performance and above all in terms of torque more clear. The last six-cylinder, however, were sold until 1972.

However, the end of the DBS came much later, namely in 1989, when the last descendant was taken out of production. However, DBS was not called DBS long before, because not only had owner David Brown sold the manufacturer Aston Martin in 1972 (for £ 100), even his abbreviation “DB” did not survive him.