6.5 C
New York
Thursday, February 25, 2021

A smelly symptom of Parkinson’s disease that you shouldn’t overlook

Must Read

FDA backs effectiveness of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine with 66.1%

The FDA vaccine advisory committee will now be the one that, based on this report, will decide this Friday...

How can you get more vitamin D without Sunshine?

If you have vitamin D deficiency, don't worry. A simple way to solve this problem is to change your diet. Doctors...

Owls versus larks: scientists figure out who is more efficient at work

People who prefer to stay up late are twice as likely to lower their performance at work relative to those who are...
Kamal Saini
Kamal S. has been Journalist and Writer for Business, Hardware and Gadgets at Revyuh.com since 2018. He deals with B2b, Funding, Blockchain, Law, IT security, privacy, surveillance, digital self-defense and network policy. As part of his studies of political science, sociology and law, he researched the impact of technology on human coexistence. Email: kamal (at) revyuh (dot) com

Parkinson’s disease is caused by the loss of nerve cells in a specific part of the brain. One of the main early symptoms of this neurodegenerative condition may be excessive sweating.

Nerve cells help exchange messages between the brain and nervous system, and when they perish because of this disease, the patient begins to suffer symptoms such as slow movements, stiff muscles and tremors.

The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease tend to develop gradually, and only appear mild at first. If left untreated, sweating tends to get significantly worse.

It’s also more likely to affect the upper body, cautions the American Parkinson Disease Association, which also advises that if you’re feeling unusually sweaty without any obvious explanation, you should consider talking to a doctor about Parkinson’s.

“Not everyone with Parkinson’s disease has tremors, and tremors aren’t Proof of Parkinson’s,” the agency points out.

It should also be noted that the fact that you start sweating excessively doesn’t necessarily mean you have Parkinson’s disease. This symptom, also known as hyperhidrosis, is a very common condition. It can affect the whole body or only certain areas, while most of the time, excessive sweating improves over time.

One of the main early signs of the neurodegenerative condition may also be unexplained changes in the way you walk. For example, a person can drag one of their legs while walking, according to the European Parkinson’s Disease Association.

In some cases, changes in the way you walk may be the first signs of the disease.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Latest News

FDA backs effectiveness of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine with 66.1%

The FDA vaccine advisory committee will now be the one that, based on this report, will decide this Friday...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -