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Cannabis may ease pain, but the side effects are scary

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Jiya Saini
Jiya Saini is a Journalist and Writer at Revyuh.com. She has been working with us since January 2018. After studying at Jamia Millia University, she is fascinated by smart lifestyle and smart living. She covers technology, games, sports and smart living, as well as good experience in press relations. She is also a freelance trainer for macOS and iOS, and In the past, she has worked with various online news magazines in India and Singapore. Email: jiya (at) revyuh (dot) com

Around 100 million people in the United States suffer from chronic pain. While opioids are routinely used to treat chronic pain, they have little effect on pain in general and are linked to a slew of side effects.

US scientists who looked at previous studies on the effects of cannabinoids on chronic pain found that synthetic products with high ratios of THC to CBD, the main active compounds in cannabis, and extracted cannabis products with similar ratios were linked to moderate, short-term improvements.

A study of 25 trials and research on cannabinoids discovered that oral synthetic cannabis products with high THC-to-CBD ratios and extracted cannabis products with equivalent THC-to-CBD ratios were associated with moderate, short-term chronic pain relief.

However, these products were associated with an increased risk of adverse events and limited benefits in terms of overall performance. Annals of Internal Medicine published the findings.

Around 100 million people in the United States suffer from chronic pain. While opioids are routinely used to treat chronic pain, they have little effect on pain in general and are linked to a slew of side effects.

Cannabinoid products are an alternative that can be obtained from a variety of sources, including synthetic, extract, and whole plant sources. Compounds active in cannabis, such as THC and CBD, are referred to as “cannabinoid.”

These chemicals have previously shown pain-relieving effects that differ depending on the THC/CBD ratio.

Oregon Health & Science University researchers examined 18 randomized, placebo-controlled trials with 1,740 individuals and 7 cohort studies with 13,095 participants to assess the benefits and risks of cannabis for chronic pain.

They discovered that synthetic goods with high THC-to-CBD ratios were related with a moderate reduction in pain severity and responsiveness but also an elevated risk of drowsiness and dizziness.

The scientists also discovered that products with similar THC-to-CBD ratios showed slight increases in overall function, but products with high THC-to-CBD ratios showed no change.

They discovered, however, that evidence supporting whole-plant products, CBD, and other cannabinoids were hampered by substantial imprecision, a lack of ability to judge consistency, and research methodological flaws.

The authors also point out that the research they looked at didn’t look at harm outcomes like psychosis, cannabis use disorder, or cognitive deficits, and they didn’t include individuals who were more vulnerable to damage.

The authors of an accompanying editorial from the University of Michigan Medical School suggest physicians adopt a strategy of pragmatism and knowledge of patient experience, known cannabinoid effects, and harm reduction to provide compassionate guidance to patients who use cannabis products.

The authors emphasize that this review can provide clinicians with information on delivery methods, the effects of CBD versus THC, dose, and potential side effects.

Image Credit: Getty

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