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Common Food Habit that Could Make the Healthy Diet You May Be Eating Now Unhealthy, According to Doctor

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Are You Eating Too Fast? Doctor Reveals the Dangers of Fast Eating and Three Conditions to Watch Out For

In our fast-paced modern world, finding the time to savor a meal can be challenging. However, medical professionals, health experts, and studies have highlighted several compelling health advantages associated with prioritizing mindful eating.

In today’s fast-paced world, it’s common to find ourselves devouring a sandwich on the go, hastily munching on a salad at our desks, or swiftly finishing off leftovers straight from the fridge. When we consider a healthy diet, our thoughts typically gravitate towards incorporating fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. However, we must recognize that the time we spend eating is just as crucial as the nutritional content of our meals.

The rapid pace of modern life often makes it challenging to allocate ample time for dinner or savor a leisurely lunch. Over the past 50 years, the way we eat has transformed significantly, perhaps even more so than what we eat. It has become the norm to consume food rapidly, snack on the move, and indulge in dinner while glued to the television.

Yet, consuming our meals hastily, finishing them within a mere five minutes, can lead to short-term digestive issues and potentially contribute to severe health conditions in the long run. Additionally, it can complicate our efforts to maintain a healthy weight.

Dr. Sarah Berry, speaking on the ZOE Science and Nutrition podcast, emphasized the significance of speed eating beyond its impact on weight.

“Indeed, it does” and “there’s a lot more to eating rate than just how it interacts with our weight.”

In a conversation with host Jonathan Wolf, Dr. Berry emphasized the detrimental effects of consuming meals hastily, stating that it is detrimental to our well-being.

Dr. Berry elaborated on this issue, highlighting the importance of giving our brain adequate time to recognize satiety. Scientific research has revealed that it can take anywhere from five to even up to 20 minutes for our mind to synchronize with our stomach’s signals. Thus, consuming food too quickly disrupts this natural process.

“And research also tells us that eating more slowly increases the response of appetite-regulating hormones.”

Eating too quickly not only contributes to obesity and related diseases like type 2 diabetes but also leads to an increase in visceral fat.

According to Dr. Berry, visceral fat refers to the fat that accumulates within the abdominal walls, surrounding all of our organs.

An excess of visceral fat is strongly connected to compromised cardiometabolic health.

According to Dr. Berry, a 2017 study conducted by a cardiologist from Hiroshima University in Japan revealed that fast eaters were nearly twice as likely to develop metabolic syndrome. This eating habit was associated with various health issues, including increased weight gain, higher blood sugar levels, elevated cholesterol levels, and a larger waistline.

Dr. Berry further explained that additional research has linked faster eating with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. These studies suggest that slower chewing stimulates more insulin release, leading to better glucose control. It is believed that prolonged chewing increases saliva uptake, resulting in earlier insulin and glucose release.

In addition to the aforementioned conditions, fast eaters have also reported experiencing poor digestion and acid reflux. However, it is important to note that all of the research conducted so far has been observational in nature. Nonetheless, these findings provide valuable initial insight into the potential consequences of eating too quickly.

In summary, eating at a fast pace puts individuals at risk of three health conditions:

  1. Obesity
  2. Type 2 diabetes
  3. Metabolic syndrome.

It is always advisable to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice regarding your health.

Image Credit: Getty

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