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Delta Outbreak in Israel: half of those infected with new strain were fully vaccinated with Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

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Delta in Israel: half of those infected with the new strain were vaccinated against COVID-19
Photo by MARTIN BERNETTI/AFP via Getty Images

According to Israeli doctors, about 90% of new cases of coronavirus were probably caused by the Delta strain.

In Israel, half of those infected with the new and more dangerous strain of coronavirus Delta have previously been vaccinated with Pfizer.

Preliminary findings from Israeli doctors suggest that about 90% of new coronavirus cases are likely caused by the Delta strain. Children under the age of 16, most of whom are vaccinated, make up about half of those infected.

According to doctors, people who have been vaccinated but are still infected with Delta are more susceptible to the disease than unvaccinated.

This week, the Israeli government announced the vaccination of children aged 12 to 15. For several days now, the country has registered more than 100 cases a day. This is the highest figure since May.

Israel is now reassessing its Covid-19 regulations after moving to open up its society and economy following multiple lockdowns last year.

India has also reported multiple cases of the Delta Plus strain, which was first discovered in March.

According to Dr N K Arora, chairman of COVID-19 Working Group of the National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (NTAGI) in India:

Delta plus is having greater affinity to mucosal lining in the lungs, higher compared to other variants, but if it causes damage or not is not clear yet. It also does not mean that this variant will cause more severe disease or it is more transmissible

If a large proportion is infected then in the next wave people can develop a common cold like illness but may not develop a serious or fatal illness

Authorities and scientists around the world fear it could lead to a serious outbreak, spreading faster than its original version.

Photo by MARTIN BERNETTI/AFP via Getty Images