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Study reveals an early sign of dementia mostly ignored by people

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People with this problem have a 43 percent higher risk of developing dementia, 43 percent higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and 54 percent higher risk of stroke.

While chronic pain may be a precursor to cognitive decline, previous research has not addressed the population-level connections between widespread pain and unfavourable cognitive outcomes or stroke.

The purpose of this study, published in the journal BMJ by the team from the Framingham Heart Study, was to examine the relationship between widespread pain, a prevalent subtype of chronic pain, and eventual dementia, Alzheimer’s disease dementia, and stroke.

The experts analyzed data from 2,464 participants in a longitudinal study in the United States and divided them into three groups: those who experienced generalized or widespread pain, who felt pain in one or more joints, and who did not feel pain. In addition, factors such as blood pressure, diabetes, lifestyle, income and education were considered.

It turned out that 188 people were diagnosed with various types of dementia, which was often associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Also, 50 of them experienced widespread pain.

Based on this, it became clear that, on average, people with widespread pain have a 43 percent higher risk of developing dementia, 43 percent higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and 54 percent higher risk of stroke.

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