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Viagra saves the life of a nurse who had 70% chance of dying from COVID

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Manish Saini
Manish works as a Journalist and writer at Revyuh.com. He has studied Political Science and graduated from Delhi University. He is a Political engineer, fascinated by politics, and traditional businesses. He is also attached to many NGO's in the country and helping poor children to get the basic education. Email: Manish (at) revyuh (dot) com

She was 72 hours away from her life support machine being turned off, however Viagra “saved” her life

Viagra “saved” a nurse’s life by opening up her airway after she was hospitalized with coronavirus.

Nurse Monica Almeida was placed on a ventilator, and her family was informed that she was only 72 hours away from having her life support machine turned off by doctors.

However, within 48 hours of receiving the medication – which is generally prescribed for erectile dysfunction – her airway had opened up and she was on the road to healing.

Monica, 37, of Gainsborough, was finally freed from the hospital on Christmas Eve, which she described as a “little Christmas miracle,” according to LincolnshireLive.

She said: “It was definitely the Viagra that saved me.

Viagra saves the life of a nurse who had 70% chance of dying from COVID

“Within 48 hours it opened up my airwaves and my lungs started to respond.

“If you think how the drug works, it expands your blood vessels.

“I have asthma and my air sacks needed a little help.”

Monica’s need for oxygen decreased by around half after her therapy, and her condition began to improve.

“I had a little joke with the consultant after I came round because I knew him,” Monica added.

“He told me it was the Viagra, I laughed and thought he was joking, but he said ‘no, really, you’ve had a large dose of Viagra.’

“It was my little Christmas miracle.”

As a respiratory specialist nurse in the community for BOC Healthcare, Monica, who was born in Portugal and is now a British citizen living in Gainsborough, has treated a large number of patients infected with coronavirus while working for the NHS in North Lincolnshire. Monica is married and has two children.

While her previous experience working in the NHS helped her prepare, she admitted that knowing exactly what was going on during her time at Lincoln County Hospital made the situation even more terrifying.

Monica was dangerously close to death at one point, and her parents were told to come to England to maybe say farewell to their daughter.

Monica said: “They were told my ventilator could be turned off within 72 hours.

“They said I had just a 30% chance of survival, but I made it home for Christmas.”

“I could have been gone at just 37 years old, but I suppose I was a bit of a monkey and kept on fighting.”

According to Monica, who received her first and second COVID-19 vaccinations in March and May of this year, she was warned by a consultant in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) that she would have died if she hadn’t been vaccinated against the virus.

Monica has returned home after spending more than a month in the hospital with COVID pneumonia. She is now on the road to recovery.

Monica was diagnosed with COVID after undergoing a lateral flow test on October 31, last year. Although only a very faint line was seen, Monica was referred for a PCR test, which confirmed the diagnosis shortly after.

Her cough had been bothering her for a few weeks, but she assumed it was due to her asthma.

Monica did not experience signs of a coronavirus until a few days after receiving a positive test result.

The mother of two had lost her senses of taste and smell by day four, and the next day she coughed up blood.

Her oxygen levels had declined significantly by the fifth day.

Despite being transported by ambulance to another hospital in Greater Lincolnshire for two days in a row, Monica claims she was discharged with a prescription and no treatment after spending the night in A&E.

Within two hours of arriving at her home, she started coughing and was unable to breathe properly, prompting her husband to dial 999.

Monica was rushed to Lincoln County Hospital this time, where she was found to be severely ill and was immediately taken to the resuscitation room.

She was placed on a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine and given 15 litres of oxygen in an attempt to bring her oxygen levels back to normal.

She was taken to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on November 9 after spending the night on the COVID ward. Her condition deteriorated during the night.

As Monica’s condition worsened and her oxygen levels were failing to reach normal levels, she was placed in a coma on November 16, and has been there since.

In the week following her collapse, she was administered Viagra, which helped to open up her airways.

The medication began to have an effect on her lungs, and the amount of oxygen she required decreased by approximately 50% as her health began to improve.

“I have heard of Viagra being used on Covid patients in Europe, maybe it will become more common here,” Monica added.

Monica received four negative COVID-19 tests, including one during her final week in the hospital, before being discharged on Christmas Eve, allowing her to spend the holiday season with her family at her home.

You were reading: Viagra saves the life of a nurse who had 70% chance of dying from COVID

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