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Wednesday, June 16, 2021

The ‘cappuccino’ waves: an unusual phenomenon appears in various parts of the world

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Jiya Saini
Jiya Saini is a Journalist and Writer at Revyuh.com. She has been working with us since January 2018. After studying at Jamia Millia University, she is fascinated by smart lifestyle and smart living. She covers technology, games, sports and smart living, as well as good experience in press relations. She is also a freelance trainer for macOS and iOS, and In the past, she has worked with various online news magazines in India and Singapore. Email: jiya (at) revyuh (dot) com

A few days ago the coast of South Africa was covered with a marine foam as dense as the cream of milk of a ‘cappuccino’. The reason why this natural phenomenon – ‘Cappuccino’ waves – is so-called.

Learn more about this strange phenomenon in the Revyuh gallery.

a Cape Town resident takes photos of sea foam in the air due to an ocean storm and the cold front that runs through the city.
A Cape Town resident takes photos of sea foam in the air due to an ocean storm and the cold front that runs through the city. © REUTERS / MIKE HUTCHINGS

This phenomenon can be observed in various corners of the planet, although it mainly occurs in the southern hemisphere.

'Cappuccino' waves off the coast of Portstewart in Northern Ireland.
‘Cappuccino’ waves off the coast of Portstewart in Northern Ireland. © AFP 2020 / PAUL FAITH

A beach in Oman during a storm.
A beach in Oman during a storm. © AP PHOTO / KAMRAN JEBREILI

People on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in Cape Town.
People on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in Cape Town. © REUTERS / MIKE HUTCHINGS

a car at high tide on a beach in California, USA.
A car at high tide on a beach in California, USA.
© REUTERS / @ SURFLICK BRANDON YAMAWAKI

According to scientists, this phenomenon occurs when salt and seaweed mix together with the residues resulting from human activity found in the water.

several children play in the sea foam in India.
Several children play in the sea foam in India. © AP PHOTO / R.PARTHIBHAN

Due to the action of strong air currents, dense foam is formed from this mixture of salt, algae and debris that the wind is responsible for carrying to the shore, where it ends up disappearing.

Foam in a coastal housing area in Sydney, Australia.
Foam in a coastal housing area in Sydney, Australia. © AP PHOTO / JOEL CARRETT / AAP

the participant of a swimming marathon on a Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro.
The participant of a swimming marathon on a Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro. © AP PHOTO / LEO CORREA

With this ‘cappuccino’ the sea looks like a gigantic bubble bath.

a young woman runs in Blackpool, in the northwest of England.
A young woman runs in Blackpool, in the northwest of England. © AP PHOTO / PETER BYRNE / PA

This phenomenon is not dangerous, although bathing with so much foam is not recommended.

a girl takes photos of the sea foam in Cape Town on July 13, 2020.
A girl takes photos of the sea foam in Cape Town on July 13, 2020. © REUTERS / MIKE HUTCHINGS

In recent years this wonder appears more and more often, possibly due to increasing pollution of the environment and, in particular, of the oceans. The most recent case of the ‘capuccino’ waves has been observed in South Africa.

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