Facebook deletes Trump post for spreading false data about covid-19

Facebook deletes Trump post for spreading false data about covid-19

The post shared by the US president included an excerpt from an interview in which he assures that children are “almost immune” to the coronavirus, something false

The social network Facebook has deleted this Wednesday a post shared from the U.S. President Donald Trump‘s personal Facebook page, which included an extract from an interview in which he assures that children are “almost immune” to the coronavirus, which was false.

“This video includes false claims that a group of people are immune to COVID-19, which is a violation of our policies on harmful misinformation about the coronavirus,” said a Facebook spokesman, Andy Stone, in a statement collected by the US press.

Specifically, during the interview, granted to Fox News, Trump has assured that children should return to face-to-face classes because they are “almost immune” or “virtually immune” to covid-19.

Trump insisted that the coronavirus “will disappear” at some point and maintained that minors are almost immune to the virus to defend the opening of schools.

“It will disappear. It will disappear. Things are gone. I have no doubt that it will go away,” Trump said during a press conference at the White House, when the United States approaches 5 million cases and exceeds 158,000 deaths, thus being the country most punished in the world for the pandemic.

Since the arrival of the virus in the United States, Trump has insisted on several occasions that it will disappear, while the social, economic and health crisis in the country he presides is getting worse at times.

For its part, Trump’s presidential campaign has accused the company of “flagrant bias.” “The president was saying that children are less susceptible to coronavirus,” said campaign deputy press secretary Courtney Parella in a statement collected by NBC News.

“Another day, another sign of Silicon Valley’s blatant bias against this president, where the rules only apply in one direction,” he added, before re-adding that “social media companies are not the arbiters of truth.”

This is the first time that Facebook has deleted a post by the president for misinforming about the coronavirus pandemic, but it is not the first clash that the company and Trump have had. In mid-June, the social network withdrew several ads from its campaign for violating “anti-hate” policies and containing a symbol linked to the Nazis.

Trump has also had a run-in with Twitter, this time because the social network included a fact check in some of his messages that claimed that voting by mail would lead to electoral fraud.

Days later , the president signed an executive order directed at social networking companies that, as he explained, seeks to “defend freedom of expression from one of the greatest dangers the United States has ever faced.”