6.5 C
New York
Monday, January 25, 2021

China sends two satellites to study gravitational waves

Must Read

Scientists discover a promising new way to reduce the risk of preterm birth

This new promising can help about 15 million women each year, who are exposed to the risk of preterm birth

British strain of coronavirus in the US may “cause further damage, including death” – Anthony Fauci

The White House's leading epidemiologist said that the new British strain of coronavirus is already present "in at least...

Scientists find differences in COVID-19 mortality in different races

Different races carry the coronavirus differently
Jiya Saini
Jiya Saini is a Journalist and Writer at Revyuh.com. She has been working with us since January 2018. After studying at Jamia Millia University, she is fascinated by smart lifestyle and smart living. She covers technology, games, sports and smart living, as well as good experience in press relations. She is also a freelance trainer for macOS and iOS, and In the past, she has worked with various online news magazines in India and Singapore. Email: jiya (at) revyuh (dot) com

With the help of GECAM satellites, scientists plan to observe the electromagnetic phenomena accompanying gravitational waves.

China has successfully launched two GECAM satellites into orbit, designed to study gravitational waves and their accompanying electromagnetic phenomena. This was reported by Xinhua on Thursday, December 10.

The satellites were launched at 04:14 local time using the Changzheng-11 (Long March-11 rocket) launch vehicle from the Xichang cosmodrome in the southwestern province of Sichuan.

With the help of Gravitational Wave High-energy Electromagnetic Counterpart All-sky Monitor (GECAM) satellites, scientists plan to observe the gravitational waves of electromagnetic phenomena, fast radio bursts of high-energy radiation, bursts of gamma radiation. Spacecraft will also allow studying the so-called compact objects – neutron stars and black holes.

The current launch marks the 355th launch for the Changzheng series launch vehicles.

Earlier this week, China launched Gaofen-14, an optical Earth remote sensing satellite from the Xichang Cosmodrome. It was launched into orbit by the Changzheng-3B launch vehicle.

And in November, China launched the world’s first 6G test satellite. It should demonstrate how well the experimental sixth-generation network technology works.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Latest News

Scientists discover a promising new way to reduce the risk of preterm birth

This new promising can help about 15 million women each year, who are exposed to the risk of preterm birth
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -