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Dozens of 2,000-year-old figurines found in Turkey

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A unique collection of figurines sheds light on the mysteries of the Hellenistic period of Myra and Lycia.

During excavations in southwestern Turkey, archaeologists have discovered dozens of terracotta figurines of gods, goddesses, men, women, and animals over 2,000 years old.

It is noted that the statuettes were found on the territory of the ancient city of Mira in the Turkish province of Antalya. Some of them have preserved paint and inscriptions. 

“The collection of figurines gives us detailed information about what existed in the mysterious world under a thick layer of silt in the first and second centuries BC,” the head of the Nevzat Cevik, Professor of Archaeology at Acdeniz University in Turkey.

“The collection of figurines gives us detailed information about what existed in the mysterious World under a thick layer of silt in the first and second centuries BC,” said study leader Nevzat Çevik, professor of archeology at Akdeniz University in Turkey. 

According to him, the finds provide “important clues about the Hellenistic period of Myra and Lycia.”

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