6.5 C
New York
Friday, December 4, 2020

Researchers discover remains of a new species of two-fingered toothless dinosaur

Must Read

A fireball lights up the sky over Toronto and New York

Many residents of the Greater Toronto Area (Canada) claim to have seen a "fireball" in the sky over the...

The 8-step military technique that will make you sleep in 120 seconds

Maybe you're the kind of person who every time has to go to sleep suffers for a long time...

This is the reason for the extinction of most flightless birds

Scientists from the University of Gothenburg analyzed the population dynamics of all the birds that have ever existed on...

In the Gobi Desert, Mongolia, scientists have found the remains of a new species of two-fingered toothless dinosaur

The quest for an unknown species of dinosaur took researchers from Edinburgh to Mongolia, where they found multiple skeletons of this strange looking dinosaur.

The species has been named Oksoko avarsan by the researchers who made the discovery.
The fossil remains of dinosaurs are complete and well preserved, which led scientists to correctly predict its physical attributes.

The dinosaur is believed to be toothless with just two fingers on its forelimbs, shares resemblance with modern-day parrots. This omnivorous species would have had feathers, a beak and reached up to two meters in length.

This giant dinosaur is a new species unknown to the scientist before. As the dinosaur belongs to ‘oviraptors’ genus it was expected to have three fingers on its hand.
The loss of one figure is an evolutionary change undergone by the species, which indicates they must incorporate dietary and lifestyle changes in order to flourish, according to the team studying them.

The dinosaur believed to have lived in the late Cretaceous period about 68 million years ago. Like other Oviraptors, who have shown complex social behavior like communal roosting, the species is believed to be social in juvenile age as the four skeletons were found resting together.

The discovery was first made public in the journal Royal Society Open Science. The team of researchers included scientists from Canada, Japan and Mongolia.

Paleantologist Gregory Funston, the lead author of the study, said “Oksoko avarsan is interesting because the skeletons are very complete and the way they were preserved resting together shows that juveniles roamed together in groups. But more importantly, its two-fingered hand prompted us to look at the way the hand and forelimb changed throughout the evolution of oviraptors — which hadn’t been studied before.”

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Latest News

A fireball lights up the sky over Toronto and New York

Many residents of the Greater Toronto Area (Canada) claim to have seen a "fireball" in the sky over the...

The 8-step military technique that will make you sleep in 120 seconds

Maybe you're the kind of person who every time has to go to sleep suffers for a long time because you cannot fall asleep,...

This is the reason for the extinction of most flightless birds

Scientists from the University of Gothenburg analyzed the population dynamics of all the birds that have ever existed on Earth. They revealed that humans are...

Is it true that being glued to the phone is bad for your mental health?

Do you spend a lot of time using your mobile phone? Don't worry, it won't have an effect on your mental health. British scientists measured the...

Scientists explain the significance of the oldest sculptures on Earth

The statuettes of "Venus Figurines" personify the ideas of ancient people about the ideal female figure. Scientists from the United States and the United Arab...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -