6.5 C
New York
Wednesday, December 2, 2020

Jerry Berg: Why Microsoft overlooks more and more bugs in Windows 10

Must Read

Scented candles on Amazon become victims of coronavirus

Complaints about the lack of scent in scented candles on Amazon increased dramatically in recent months, however, a researcher...

Russian Scientists propose to send swarm probes to decipher solar wind riddles

Russian researchers propose to send several swarm probes to the Sun to study the speed of winds, reveals the...

UK Authorizes Use of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID Vaccine

The UK government has approved an anti-coronavirus vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech. It is the first vaccine to be approved for widespread...
Aakash Molpariya
Aakash started in Nov 2018 as a writer at Revyuh.com. Since joining, as writer, he is mainly responsible for Software, Science, programming, system administration and the Technology ecosystem, but due to his versatility he is used for everything possible. He writes about topics ranging from AI to hardware to games, stands in front of and behind the camera, creates creative product images and much more. He is a trained IT systems engineer and has studied computer science. By the way, he is enthusiastic about his own small projects in game development, hardware-handicraft, digital art, gaming and music. Email: aakash (at) revyuh (dot) com

For the former Microsoft software developer Jerry Berg everything was better in the past: For 15 years he worked on the launch of Windows operating systems like Windows XP, Vista and 8. In a Youtube video, he explains why from his point of view, the current Windows 10 for new content updates contains many bugs. The reason: The company runs test scenarios automatically in virtual machines. “They do not represent diversity, they all act the same, they all have the same hardware configuration and all have the same memory,” he says.

That’s why it was up to the employees themselves to find fault with self-hosting. To do this, developers have equipped their machines with new Windows builds and tested this version in realistic operation. Bugs were noticed so immediately. Meanwhile, this method is probably less widespread. Instead, Microsoft relies more on Windows Insiders and their diagnostic data. If the community reports an error, the corresponding scenario will run on the test systems of the Windows developers. If the bug is confirmed by it, be it at the next instance to fix it.

Telemetry does not tell the whole story

However, many error messages from the Windows Insider are not really working parts of the OS and no bugs. Therefore, these would partly not forwarded. In addition, only a very small proportion of insiders are ready to report certain errors in a manner that is usable for Microsoft. “Fundamentally, Microsoft has replaced flesh-and-blood people who create automatic test sequences by ourselves – the consumers -“ says Berg.

In addition, user telemetry data would not help identify external dependencies on crashing or misbehaving processes. In many situations, it is not the reported program itself that is responsible for bugs, but some other parallel software. Although it is possible to create complete snapshots of a configuration and situation, such full crash dumps would very rarely be uploaded due to their sheer size. Microsoft would most often have to deal with small dumps – snapshots of the process crash within memory – and manually assemble the associated test environment.

For developers, therefore, it is now difficult to find all errors in insider builds and to fix them properly, before the new Windows version will be sent to all users. After some flawed content patches and corresponding public response, Microsoft Updates are now spreading waves. Users in a wave would be randomly selected after hardware configuration. According to Berg, the first wave will, in principle, be a probably still flawed new version of Windows 10. They act like Windows Insiders themselves. Using the first-party telemetry data, Microsoft can find, fix, and distribute patches to other users.

Berg is of the opinion that Microsoft’s old test methods did not lead to the current situation. He welcomes, however, that Microsoft is understandable and his test scenario has now adjusted something. “They go in baby steps,” he says. Nevertheless, he believes that at least in this case, the company should return to old ways and hire a dedicated test team again.

- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisement -

Latest News

Scented candles on Amazon become victims of coronavirus

Complaints about the lack of scent in scented candles on Amazon increased dramatically in recent months, however, a researcher...

Russian Scientists propose to send swarm probes to decipher solar wind riddles

Russian researchers propose to send several swarm probes to the Sun to study the speed of winds, reveals the director of the Space Research...

UK Authorizes Use of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID Vaccine

The UK government has approved an anti-coronavirus vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech. It is the first vaccine to be approved for widespread unrestricted use in Europe. The results...

Developers find a way to simulate PS2 games on the new Xbox console

Developers have made it possible to launch the games from the old PlayStation 2 in Microsoft's newly released 'boxes', the Xbox series X and...

Researchers reveal how insects got their wings

The evolution of insect wings is a question that has been debated by scientists for more than a century. Some said that wings evolved from...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -