Trump or Biden, who would be better for Venezuela?

Trump or Biden, who would be better for Venezuela?
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Donald Trump said in an interview to the Axios news portal that he would be willing to meet with Maduro, giving a radical turn to his policy with Caracas. This statement has a background framed in the American election tirade, but would a change in the Administration really change the US aggression towards Venezuela?

Venezuela and the United States had a pro-American economic relationship for more than a century. Venezuela’s oil and steel production is a carbon-side copy of industrial developments in Texas and Pennsylvania, while technological and financial dependence reached colonial levels.

The relationship was unilaterally interrupted by the Obama administration and hardened by Trump, whose sole purpose is to defend the Bolivarian Revolution once and for all.

Both Democrats and Republicans have been answered in both soft power, hard power, as well as their not-so-intelligent (smart power) in the last 21 years of history against Venezuela, with varying results, from quasi-perfect to nefarious and laughable in achieving their goals, ranging from the April 2002 coup, going through the battle of the bridges, to the bay of Macuto.

It has been a state policy of the United States of both Democrats and Republicans, as well as the former candidate Bernie Sanders to demonize Nicolas Maduro and try to classify him before world public opinion at the same level as Hitler and Pol Pot, except for some dissident voices in American politics. To be president of that country, when referring to Venezuela, you must qualify it, at least, as a failed and outlaw state.

The reason of this obvious phenomenon, proven and reported in past elections, is that in Florida there is a huge community of Hispanics who do not sympathize with the left-wing governments of their respective home countries. Just to win the Hispanic vote, there’s a competition to see who will make their family, friends and countrymen suffer the most in Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua.

Now, the current Nicolas Maduro is not the same as in 2016, he has strengthened exponentially and is on the counterattack. Maduro has done things economically that no one, not even Chavez himself, dared to do, such as liberalizing the official exchange rate, as well as sincere the price of fuel; all this without firing a single tear gas bomb, with almost no political and social cost, in pressing circumstances and aggravated by the criminal blockade and the situation of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The actions taken by Trump against Venezuela to strangle its economy have succeeded, on the one hand, in impoverishing the most vulnerable nationals, taking them to social levels already surpassed by the Bolivarian Revolution, reminding them of their condition as poor people who lived in the 80s and 90s of the last century, strengthening its support for all the social policies of the Maduro Government.

The war of economic aggression has had a boomerang effect on its objectives, since the Venezuelan opposition base residing in its country, which at first was pleased by the indiscriminate attack by the United States, is now directly affected, either by restrictions on travel abroad, not having satellite television service, among other situations produced directly or indirectly by the action of Washington.

The situation of the pandemic in South America, its obsolete health systems and dismantled by neoliberalism, has caused several waves of migrants to return, even on foot to Venezuela, by the date of publication of this article, more than 60,000 compatriots have been reported returnees.

This has led to a resounding continental failure of Washington’s aggressive policy since the so-called Lima Group and the Almagro OAS are acolytes of Donald Trump. The false news of millions leaving Venezuela is silenced by the thousands who return daily to a strange dictatorship that protects and welcomes them better than the democracies that condemned them to hunger and misery.

In addition, the revival of Venezuelan refineries with Iran’s help, including the Paraguana CRP, the world’s second-largest, is an increasingly obvious reality. Followed by the statement by the President of Mexico, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, where he expressed his intention to sell gasoline to Venezuela, if requested by Nicolas Maduro, apart from having that government with strategic alliances with China, Russia and Turkey.

This whole picture, which has been paradoxically generated by unilateral US sanctions, and which failed to bend the Bolivarian Revolution, but has opposed to screwing Nicolas Maduro in power, has allowed him to heal the rentier and parasitical economy that Venezuela had and has reactivated the sleeping and drunk production forces of petrodollars, which no longer exist.

Today, it is only a matter of time before Venezuela for its own humble efforts to be self-sufficient and fully independent of this toxic relationship with the US. The South American country experiences the crisis of the partner who divorces the abusive and exploiting spouse, embarks on a path alone, full of sacrifices, but who at the end of the way will lead to full freedom and economic independence.

Now the reader ask himself who is better between Trump and Biden for Venezuela?