In Germany, Archaeologists found a 1.5 thousand-year-old tomb

    In Germany, Archaeologists found a 1.5 thousand-year-old tomb
    Photo: dailymail.co.uk A unique tomb was found when the site was being prepared for the construction of a poultry farm

    According to researchers, it belongs to an Ancient Germanic lord and considers it to be the most important finding in the country over the past 40 years.

    In Germany, in the federal state of Saxony-Anhalt, workers were preparing a site for the construction of a poultry farm and unexpectedly found an ancient tomb, which, according to experts, is about 1.5 thousand years old and belongs to Ancient Germanic lord, writes the Daily Mail.

    A bronze cauldron was found in the center of the monument, probably containing the ashes of the deceased. “We haven’t found the prince himself yet. But maybe his ashes are in the bronze cauldron,” said archaeologist Suzanne Friedrich from the Landesmuseum Halle.

    Around the cauldron, the team found the skeletons of six women. Archaeologists believe they may have been wives or concubines of the deceased. It is also to be seen whether they were killed or whether they were sacrificed.

    Artificats found at ancient Germanic lord
    Photo from Daily Mail
    Artifacts found around ancient Germanic lord
    Photo from Daily Mail
    Artifacts found from ancient Germanic lord site
    Photo from Daily Mail
    Site where ancient Germanic lord was found
    Photo from Daily Mail

    The remains of 11 animals were found inside the tomb, including cattle, dogs and horses. Apparently, an important dignitary was buried here.

    Archaeologists have discovered 60 more graves near the tomb. They are believed to have appeared between 480 and 530 AD after the fall of the Roman Empire.

    In the graves, scientists have found valuable artifacts – a very well-preserved glass bowl, gilded clasps for clothes, a gold coin depicting Emperor Zeno, and much more.

    According to experts, this is the most important finding in the country over the past 40 years.