HomeLifestyleHealth & FitnessHigh Blood Pressure: This drug type is little safer than popular ones

High Blood Pressure: This drug type is little safer than popular ones

Published on

For doctors, deciding on the right medicine for a patient’s high blood pressure may be difficult since there are so many options.

Two commonly prescribed medications for patients with high blood pressure were found to be equally effective at improving cardiovascular outcomes, but the more commonly prescribed medication has slightly more side effects, according to a multinational observational study led by Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons researchers.

The research, which analysed claims and electronic health records from millions of patients worldwide, is the largest to date in terms of comparing the safety and efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), two commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications.

ACE inhibitors and ARBs are two options, and they both work in a similar manner. Both decrease the risk of stroke and heart attacks, but it is well established that ACE inhibitors raise the risk of cough and angioedema (severe swelling in the face and airways).

They examined insurance claims and electronic health data from roughly 3 million patients in Europe, Korea, and the United States who were beginning antihypertensive therapy with either an ACE inhibitor or an ARB to determine the optimal option.

It was difficult to conduct research using data from electronic health records and insurance claims. They may be inaccuracies, omissions, or include information that distorts the findings.

And sort it out this issue, the researchers used a number of cutting-edge mathematical methods created by the OHDSI collaborative network to significantly decrease bias and balance the two treatment groups as if they had been recruited in a prospective study.

With the help of this method, the scientists tracked four cardiovascular outcomes–heart attack, heart failure, stroke, and sudden cardiac death–and 51 side effects in patients after they started antihypertensive treatment.

The researchers discovered that almost all of the patients—2.3 million—had an ACE inhibitor given to them. Although the two medication classes showed no difference in the risk of severe cardiovascular problems in individuals with hypertension, one was shown to be more effective in lowering the risk of other heart conditions.

Patients were on ACE inhibitors had a greater risk of cough and angioedema, but they also had a higher risk of pancreatitis and gastrointestinal haemorrhage, according to the research.

“Our study largely confirmed that both antihypertensive drug classes are similarly effective, though ARBs may be a little safer than ACE inhibitors,” Hripcsak says.

“This provides that extra bit of evidence that may make physicians feel more comfortable about prescribing ARBs versus ACE inhibitors when initiating monotherapy for patients with hypertension. And it shows that large-scale observational studies such as this can offer important insight in choosing among different treatment options in the absence of large randomized clinical trials.”

Latest articles

Scientists in Fear of This New Predator From Red Sea Eating Native Species in Mediterranean

From Red Sea to Mediterranean: The Unstoppable Spread of a New Predator Researchers from Wageningen...

Does This Mean We Stopped Being Animal and Started Being Human Due to ‘Copy Paste’ Errors?

A Surprise Finding About Ancestral Genes In Animals Could Make You Rethink The Roles...

The One Lifestyle Choice That Could Reduce Your Heart Disease Risk By More Than 22%

New Research Reveals How To Reduce Stress-related Brain Activity And Improve Heart Health Recent studies...

Aging: This Is What Happens Inside Your Body Right After Exercise

The concept of reversing aging, once relegated to the realm of science fiction, has...

More like this

Scientists in Fear of This New Predator From Red Sea Eating Native Species in Mediterranean

From Red Sea to Mediterranean: The Unstoppable Spread of a New Predator Researchers from Wageningen...

Does This Mean We Stopped Being Animal and Started Being Human Due to ‘Copy Paste’ Errors?

A Surprise Finding About Ancestral Genes In Animals Could Make You Rethink The Roles...

The One Lifestyle Choice That Could Reduce Your Heart Disease Risk By More Than 22%

New Research Reveals How To Reduce Stress-related Brain Activity And Improve Heart Health Recent studies...