HomeLifestyleHealth & FitnessThis is the Alzheimer's Symptom Most People Feel First

This is the Alzheimer’s Symptom Most People Feel First

Published on

What to know about dementia and risk factors to watch out for.

Dementia is a debilitating neurological condition that can severely impact cognitive functions such as language, memory, and decision-making, to the extent that it interferes with daily life. It is characterized by a cluster of symptoms that progressively worsen over time and affect the brain.

There are more than 100 different types of dementia, with the most well-known being Alzheimer’s disease, which accounts for 60-80% of cases. Vascular dementia, caused by microscopic bleeding and blockages in the brain’s blood vessels, is the second most common form.

Mixed dementia occurs when individuals experience brain changes associated with multiple types of dementia simultaneously.

It’s important to note that there are other conditions, including reversible ones like thyroid problems and vitamin deficiencies, that can cause dementia-like symptoms.

Although dementia is commonly associated with individuals over the age of 65, it is not a normal part of the aging process, and younger people can also be affected.

Recognizable signs of dementia include memory loss, getting lost in familiar places, and difficulty with everyday tasks. However, there are other signs to be aware of.

In Alzheimer’s disease, for example, individuals may struggle to recall the route to a familiar location when driving. Another lesser-known symptom is difficulty perceiving color or contrast, which can impact driving abilities.

The Alzheimer’s Association highlights that vision problems, balance issues, and trouble reading can also be indicative of the disease, emphasizing that these problems should not be mistaken for age-related changes or cataracts.

A recent survey conducted by the Alzheimer’s Society revealed that only one in three individuals inform their doctors about dementia symptoms experienced by themselves or their loved ones within the first month.

Many people remain silent due to uncertainty about distinguishing between dementia symptoms and normal aging. The survey, involving 1,100 participants, indicated that 33 percent of individuals keep their concerns to themselves for over a month.

Shockingly, only 15 percent of people address the issue immediately, while 11 percent admit to never raising their concerns even after noticing the first symptom.

Image Credit: Shutterstock

This article was created using AI tools to enhance the editorial research process at revyuh.com. Prior to publication, a news editor carefully reviewed the content. If you come across any errors, please report them to [email protected].

Latest articles

Neuroscience Breakthrough: Study Pinpoints Brain Activity That Helps Prevent Us From Getting Lost

No more wrong turns: Explore the findings of a groundbreaking study revealing the brain's...

Brief Anger Hampers Blood Vessel Function Leading to Increased Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke – New Study

New research in the Journal of the American Heart Association unveils how fleeting bouts...

New Blood Test Pinpoints Future Stroke Risk – Study Identifies Inflammatory Molecules as Key Biomarker

Breakthrough Discovery: A Simple Blood Test Can Gauge Susceptibility to Stroke and Cognitive Decline...

Enceladus: A Potential Haven for Extraterrestrial Life in its Hidden Ocean Depths

Enceladus: Insights into Moon's Geophysical Activity Shed Light on Potential Habitability In the vast expanse...

More like this

Neuroscience Breakthrough: Study Pinpoints Brain Activity That Helps Prevent Us From Getting Lost

No more wrong turns: Explore the findings of a groundbreaking study revealing the brain's...

Brief Anger Hampers Blood Vessel Function Leading to Increased Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke – New Study

New research in the Journal of the American Heart Association unveils how fleeting bouts...

New Blood Test Pinpoints Future Stroke Risk – Study Identifies Inflammatory Molecules as Key Biomarker

Breakthrough Discovery: A Simple Blood Test Can Gauge Susceptibility to Stroke and Cognitive Decline...