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Friday, December 4, 2020

How does the microwave affect the Wi-Fi signal?

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Jiya Saini
Jiya Saini is a Journalist and Writer at Revyuh.com. She has been working with us since January 2018. After studying at Jamia Millia University, she is fascinated by smart lifestyle and smart living. She covers technology, games, sports and smart living, as well as good experience in press relations. She is also a freelance trainer for macOS and iOS, and In the past, she has worked with various online news magazines in India and Singapore. Email: jiya (at) revyuh (dot) com

It is already known that microwaves can cause interference and affect the Wi-Fi signal. The fact interests scientists and people in general. The ‘youtuber’ Jessie Carabajal shows us the power of these waves thanks to a curious experiment.

During the experiment the young man sat next to the microwave with a laptop connected to a device that analyzes networks by measuring the electromagnetic spectrum in the room in real time. 

Then the youtuber tuned the device to a 2.4GHz frequency and started the oven. 

As a result, the network bandwidth on some channels on the 2.4 GHz band drops from 30-50 mbps to only 6-7 mbps

That doesn’t happen on all channels, but it can cause drastic drops on some of them anyway. In previous tests, it was even observed how these lost bandwidth and fell to 0 mbps, explains Carabajal.

Microwaves and routers use the same type of electromagnetic energy and operate on the 2.4 Ghz band. But the former emits radiation with much higher energy. 

Most ovens typically have a power rating of about 1,000 watts. In turn, the routers hardly exceed 100 milliwatts. In other words, we would need about 10,000 devices of this type placed at the corresponding angle on a large satellite dish so that we could cook something using their emissions.

Microwaves emit its radiation to heat the food inside a Faraday cage, but this container is not perfect and you usually see leaks through the door, which is enough to produce interference that affects Wi-Fi.

If our electronic devices have been connected near microwave and we cannot put them elsewhere, it is advisable to connect them to the 5 GHz band, which, according to the experiment, is not affected by the activity of the oven.

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