HomeLifestyleHealth & FitnessKeto Diet May Promote Tumor Growth and Progression

Keto Diet May Promote Tumor Growth and Progression

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Despite encouraging studies, no major cancer organization supports the ketogenic diet for cancer prevention or treatment.

However, while the ketogenic diet has many perks, it also has some dangers.

The diet, for example, is highly high in fat. Furthermore, numerous foods commonly used in the diet, such as red meat, have been linked to an increased risk of some malignancies.

Keto Diet May Promote Tumor Growth and Progression
Keto Diet May Promote Tumor Growth and Progression

In terms of cancer-fighting foods, such as whole grains, fruits, and some vegetables, the diet is severely restricted.

It can also be difficult for those who are undergoing standard cancer treatments to eat enough calories while on a diet. Low-carb diets, such as ketogenic diets, are known to help people lose weight.

A high intake of fat in the diet is linked to an increase in colorectal cancer risk due to a hormonal signal that encourages the proliferation of possibly malignant cells.

The study, which was carried out in a mouse model, reveals that lifestyle and genetics are linked. Animals with an APC mutation, the most prevalent genetic mutation found in humans with colorectal cancer, developed cancer faster when fed a high-fat diet, according to the researchers.

the ketogenic diet promotes tumor growth and progression

“It could be that when you’re genetically prone to get colon cancer, something like a high-fat diet is the second hit,” says study co-author Ruth Yu.

The intestine and colon (often referred to as the “gut”) are labor-intensive organs. To repair the damage caused by digestive acids, your gut must replace its lining on a regular basis as you eat. The gut contains a population of stem cells that may restore lining cells when necessary.

Colorectal tumors are usually caused by mutations in these stem cells, according to researchers. The most prevalent colon cancer-linked mutation is in the APC gene, which governs how often cells divide and functions as a “tumor suppressor” gene. Mutations in the APC gene can override this regulation, allowing cells to divide rapidly and develop cancer.

“We saw a very dramatic increase in cancer growth correlated to bile acid,” says Michael Downes. “Our experiments showed that maintaining a balance of bile acids is key to reducing cancer growth.”

Another 25,000-person study presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich found that persons on low-carb diets had the highest chance of dying from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and all causes combined.

The study authors said: “Low carbohydrate diets might be useful in the short term to lose weight, lower blood pressure, and improve blood glucose control, but our study suggests that in the long-term they are linked with an increased risk of death from any cause, and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer.”

Another report released in the Lancet indicated that persons who followed low-carb, high-animal-protein diets (such as the keto diet) had a higher risk of early death than those who consumed carbs in moderation. (However, low-carb dieters who chose plant-based proteins over meat and dairy experienced the reverse effect.)

Despite the fact that studies in this area are limited, according to Trusted Source, the ketogenic diet may have some benefit in cancer treatment. To completely comprehend the potential benefits of the ketogenic diet in cancer prevention and therapy, more research is needed.

It’s crucial to remember, though, that the present research is still in its early stages.

You should never, ever choose an alternative treatment like the ketogenic diet above traditional cancer treatment.

Your best bet is to stick to your oncologist’s recommendations. Many common kinds of cancer can be effectively treated with conventional medical therapy.

However, a ketogenic diet might be a viable choice as an adjuvant therapy, which means it’s taken in addition to traditional treatments.

“Keto is not a great long-term diet, as it is not a balanced diet,” said Dr. Nancy P. Rahnama, a bariatric and internal medicine doctor based in California. “A diet that is devoid of fruit and vegetables will result in long-term micronutrient deficiencies that can have other consequences.”

Image Credit: Getty

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